surname

[ noun sur-neym; verb sur-neym, sur-neym ]SEE DEFINITION OF surname

Synonyms for surname

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SURNAME

She had never known the surname, and on two of the cards "Ph." appeared.

The signature was extended in full, with the surname blackly underlined.

This is the surname of several renowned gastronomers of old Rome.

They called him Anarchisto de Barcelona, as if it were his Christian name and surname.

“Whatever your surname may be, it makes no difference to me,” was his reply.

Surname or nickname; but are there any philosophers at the court of France?

His father liked Henry so well for a surname that he had him christened Henry, too.

They are distinguished by that of their tribe, or some other surname.

He was known, then, to the master and mistress, this Giovanni with the Irish surname.

He was called Peter the Hermit because he was a hermit, and not, as some have maintained, because it was his surname.

WORD ORIGIN

early 14c., "name, title, or epithet added to a person's name," from sur "above" (see sur-) + name (n.); modeled on Anglo-French surnoun "surname" (early 14c.), variant of Old French surnom, from sur "over" + nom "name."

An Old English word for this was freonama, literally "free name." Meaning "family name" is first found late 14c. Hereditary surnames existed among Norman nobility in England in early 12c., among common people began to be used 13c., increasingly frequent until near universal by end of 14c. The process was later in the north of England than the south. The verb is attested from 1540s.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SURNAME

agnomen

nounnickname
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.