subtraction

[ suh b-trak-shuh n ]SEE DEFINITION OF subtraction

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SUBTRACTION

But the family-party was soon to be broken up—not by subtraction, but by addition.

But the addition or subtraction disclosed a deficit and he exclaimed at it.

Now it appears to me that a little child, with the simple rules of addition and subtraction, could have refuted this man.

It will be seen that the latter method is by addition, the former by subtraction.

The Indian is no fool, although he can't do addition and subtraction.

And soon, too, she became at ease with money, and sure of her subtraction.

Jerry had a pained look on his face as he tried to do the subtraction in his head.

Without the subtraction of our all, first, we cannot obtain the addition, his all.

The answer in subtraction is called the remainder, or difference.

New work was then added in the form of division and subtraction.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1400, "withdrawal, removal," from Late Latin subtractionem (nominative subtractio) "a drawing back, taking away," from past participle stem of Latin subtrahere "take away, draw off," from sub "from under" (see sub-) + trahere "to pull, draw" (see tract (n.1)). The mathematical sense is attested from early 15c.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SUBTRACTION

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