subsidy

[ suhb-si-dee ]SEE DEFINITION OF subsidy

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SUBSIDY

The man who is honest in his dealings with his fellowman has a subsidy which money cannot buy.

But they followed their old habits when the year had expired and the subsidy ceased.

On the 29th the crown debts were alleged as a reason for demanding a subsidy.

Prussia had agreed in the spring to accept an English subsidy.

It is ten years since I had a subsidy, in all which time I have been sparing to trouble you.

In 1567 he was assessed on goods to the value of £4 for the subsidy 3s.

He contributed to the subsidy in Wilmecote in 1526 and 1546.

Thomas Shackspeare, of Rowington, was assessed for the subsidy of 1597.

Subsidy Rolls of several Hundreds in Essex, a paper book, 246/19.

Had the subsidy been refused, the result would have been the same.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., from Anglo-French subsidie, from Old French subside "help, aid, contribution," from Latin subsidium "help, aid, assistance, (military) reinforcements," from sub "behind, near" (see sub-) + sedere "to sit" (see sedentary).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SUBSIDY

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