Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR STEALER

You are young to be a stealer of women;––the saints send you a whiter road!

I remember the time when such a head would have started a stealer anywhere.

The stealer was rewarded with a pension, the keeper's recompense is—to come.

"The woman is a stealer," she added to her breathless recital.

He is commonly a stealer of Horses, which they terme a Priggar of Paulfreys.

You are not by nature a criminal and a stealer of women, I know.

The "difficulty" was, in plain English, that it had been stolen from the Indians at some peril to the stealer's scalp.

One of the cards bore these words: 'Much-respected Deputy and collar-sewer—or stealer.'

It was not possible that this was a bad man, a stealer of children, a pilferer of old men's cupboards.

The stealer refuses, and puts them behind her and stands on her defence.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English stelan "to commit a theft" (class IV strong verb; past tense stæl, past participle stolen), from Proto-Germanic *stelanan (cf. Old Saxon stelan, Old Norse, Old Frisian stela, Dutch stelen, Old High German stelan, German stehlen, Gothic stilan), of unknown origin.

Most IE words for steal have roots in notions of "hide," "carry off," or "collect, heap up." Attested as a verb of stealthy motion from c.1300 (e.g. to steal away, late 14c.); of glances, sighs, etc., from 1580s. To steal (someone) blind first recorded 1974.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR STEALER

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.