EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SPEED UP

The war will speed up "belief" in some and "disbelief" in others.

If you'll speed up you'll get the jump on those fellows every time.

Then we could speed up to the point where we could polish ourselves off.

We'll introduce the chariot and also heavy carts to speed up logistics.

Good Lord, man, you'll get nabbed if you speed up like this within limits.

What you'll have to do this year, my boy, is speed up a little.

Then the curtain stuck, and we was kept hanging about for a minute, and had to speed up.

We've been able to speed up the life processes of the microbes about ten times.

He shoved his speed up and up while Jimmy sat with his heart in his mouth.

There had been attempts to speed up the transport before the railways were made.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English sped "success, prosperity, advancement," from Proto-Germanic *spodiz (cf. Old Saxon spod "success," Dutch spoed "haste, speed," Old High German spuot "success," Old Saxon spodian "to cause to succeed," Middle Dutch spoeden, Old High German spuoten "to haste"), from PIE *spo-ti- "speed," from *spe- "to thrive, prosper" (cf. Sanskrit sphayate "increases," Latin sperare "to hope," Old Church Slavonic spechu "endeavor," Lithuanian speju "to have leisure").

Meaning "quickness of motion or progress" emerged in late Old English (usually adverbially, in dative plural, e.g. spedum feran), emerging fully in early Middle English. Meaning "gear of a machine" is attested from 1866. Meaning "methamphetamine, or a related drug," first attested 1967, from its effect on users. Speed bump is 1975; figurative sense is 1990s. Full speed is recorded from late 14c. Speed reading first attested 1965. Speedball "mix of cocaine and morphine or heroin" is recorded from 1909.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SPEED UP

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.