Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SMILES

For Saffy, she was a thing of smiles and of tears just as they chose to come.

See how pleased she is--how full of smiles and happiness she seems.

The smiles which surrounded him were of his own creation, and he participated in the happiness he had bestowed.

She could distribute, and did distribute pretty looks and smiles to every one among them.

Lady Coryston's smiles were scarcely less formidable than her frowns.

Smiles were upon his lips, and a gentle motion shook his frame.

One smiles as one reads the delicate sketches of Miss Jewett.

Monsieur Jules understood and withdrew with more bows and smiles.

"Oh, that will do excellently," said Lady Cecily, all smiles again.

Bright were the smiles under the spreading tent of the glade.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, perhaps from Middle Low German *smilen or a Scandinavian source (e.g. Danish smile "smile," Swedish smila "smile, smirk, simper, fawn"), from Proto-Germanic *smil-, extended form of PIE root *smei- "to laugh, smile" (cf. Old English smerian "to laugh at, scorn," Old High German smieron "to smile," Latin mirus "wonderful," mirari "to wonder"). Related: Smiled; smiling.

Gradually pushed the usual Old English word, smearcian (modern smirk), into a specific, unpleasant sense. Of the eyes, from 1759. Figuratively, as indicating favor or encouragement, from c.1400. Romance, Celtic, and Slavic languages tend to use a diminutive of the word for "laugh" to mean "smile" (e.g. Latin ridere "laugh;" subridere "smile"), perhaps literally "small laugh" or "low laugh."

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.