Synonyms for set sail

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SET SAIL

Already the last of the ships had set sail, and the camp was deserted.

Phipps then set sail to find the Spanish ship and fish up the treasure.

Everywhere, they lived on the shores, and ever were they ready to set sail.

Three days after the ships had set sail the Pinta lost her rudder.

We'll stay here until we get another craft to set sail in, and no longer.

When we have gathered in all the pearls we will set sail for South America.

Next day the Ida, with Phillips on board, set sail for England.

All this time the wind was contrary, and the troops unable to set sail.

They were to set sail for Ruddy Cove at dawn of the next morning.

Favored by a good wind from the south, they set sail for Macouba.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English segl "sail, veil, curtain," from Proto-Germanic *seglom (cf. Old Saxon, Swedish segel, Old Norse segl, Old Frisian seil, Dutch zeil, Old High German segal, German Segel), of obscure origin with no known cognates outside Germanic (Irish seol, Welsh hwyl "sail" are Germanic loan-words). In some sources (Klein, OED) referred to PIE root *sek- "to cut," as if meaning "a cut piece of cloth." To take the wind out of (someone's) sails (1888) is to deprive (someone) of the means of progress, especially by sudden and unexpected action, "as by one vessel sailing between the wind and another vessel," ["The Encyclopaedic Dictionary," 1888].

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SET SAIL

embark

verbget on transportation object
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.