septicemia

[ sep-tuh-see-mee-uh ]SEE DEFINITION OF septicemia
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SEPTICEMIA

Septicemia, erysipelas, lockjaw, and gangrene were variously attributed to dampness and a multitude of other conditions.

At present we must recognize it as a specific inflammation due to a bacterial poison and closely allied to septicemia.

Again are found the traces of excessive emaciation, or the lesions of septicemia.

Septicemia terminates fatally with its usual train of symptoms.

In very acute cases, death from septicemia may occur in a few days.

A septicemia of the southern army worm caused by Bacillus cereus.

In septicemia the blood contains both pyogenic toxins and multiplying pyogenic organisms.

In septic infection, or septicemia, only a small number of organisms may get into the blood, but they multiply rapidly.

There is either a toxemia or a septicemia, with the usual symptoms of a general sepsis.

A very important point is not to mistake typhoid for a septicemia in its early stage.

WORD ORIGIN

1857, Modern Latin septicæmia, from French septicoemi, coined irregularly by French physician Pierre-Adolphe Piorry (1794-1879) in 1837 from Greek septikos (see septic) + haima "blood" (see -emia).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SEPTICEMIA

blood poisoning

nouninfection of blood
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.