Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SCARFED

Probably this is one of the best varieties of the scarfed joint.

The other piece is scarfed on both edges to fit into this opening.

The arms and back are made in three parts, the scarfed joints coming immediately over the back legs.

In the fort, black-garbed Jesuits and scarfed officers mingled at Champlain's table.

Black Jesuits and scarfed officers mingled at Champlain's table.

Fig. 216 is a scarfed joint with undercut vee'd ends which prevent the joint from lipping up or down or sideways.

Fig. 217 is a "fished joint," and the following difference between a scarfed and fished joint should be noted.

The ends of the pieces to be joined are scarfed as explained in the flat weld.

New juices flow, new tissues form, the wound is scarfed over, and after a time is seen only as a scar.

Black-robed Jesuits and scarfed officers mingled at Champlain's table.

WORD ORIGIN

"band of silk, strip of cloth," 1550s, "a band worn across the body or over the shoulders," probably from Old North French escarpe "sash, sling," which probably is identical with Old French escherpe "pilgrim's purse suspended from the neck," perhaps from Frankish *skirpja or some other Germanic source (cf. Old Norse skreppa "small bag, wallet, satchel"), or from Medieval Latin scirpa "little bag woven of rushes," from Latin scirpus "rush, bulrush," of unknown origin [Klein]. As a cold-weather covering for the neck, first recorded 1844. Plural scarfs began to yield to scarves early 18c., on model of half/halves, etc.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.