salamander

[ sal-uh-man-der ]SEE DEFINITION OF salamander

Synonyms for salamander

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EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SALAMANDER

Put crumbs of bread over it, and brown it with a salamander.

They may either be served up in this state, or in scallops, or put on the dish in a form, and the top browned with a salamander.

In the course of years one should become a sort of salamander.

"You ought to have been a salamander," she laughed, washing his back.

“It be de French for supper,” said Salamander, who overheard the question.

Salamander was young; he did not yet know that it is possible to over-act.

Dougall leaped up with a cry that almost equalled that of Salamander.

Tell him, Salamander, that I will do so by going to see them.

Salamander was in one of the canoes which ran alongside of the wharf.

Even Salamander forgot his jealousy and almost collapsed with wonder.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-14c., "legendary lizard-like creature that can live in fire," from Old French salamandre "legendary fiery beast," also "cricket" (12c.), from Latin salamandra, from Greek salamandra, probably of eastern origin.

The application in zoology to a tailed amphibian (known natively as an eft or newt) is first recorded 1610s. Aristotle, and especially Pliny, are responsible for the fiction of an animal that thrives in and extinguishes fires. The eft lives in damp logs and secretes a milky substance when threatened, but there is no obvious natural explanation its connection with the myth.

Also used 18c. for "a woman who lives chastely in the midst of temptations" (after Addison), and "a soldier who exposes himself to fire in battle." To rub someone a salamander was a 19c. form of German student drinking toast (einem einen salamander reiben). Related: Salamandrine; salamandroid.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SALAMANDER

amphibian

nouncold-blooded vertebrate
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.