Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR S

I say, Dirk, what do you s'pose all that yarn means about to-morrow night?

An' I s'pose you feel it all the more, seein' the round-up's jest startin' out.

S' fur 's the pitcher goes, it's about as good 's kin be did with paint, I guess.

"I s'pose you know more'n your father and mother," suggested Wade.

"I s'pose I was a poor miserable creatur' to git out of it that way," said she.

Or s'pose he had it in mind to fill in that low land, so 't we could bury there!

I s'pose they'd got to, some time, an' it might jest as well ha' been fust as last.

What under the sun do you s'pose Dave and Jont find to talk about?

Do you s'pose she tumbled, or did she put her foot through it a-purpose?

"I s'pose there's no need o' my settin' down," she remarked, bitingly.

WORD ORIGIN

suffix forming the possessive singular case of most Modern English nouns, its use gradually was extended in Middle English from Old English -es, the most common genitive inflection of masculine and neuter nouns (cf. dæg "day," genitive dæges "day's").

Old English also had genitives in -e, -re, -an, as well as "mutation-genitives" (cf. boc "book," plural bec), and the -es form never was used in plural (where -a, -ra, -na prevailed), thus avoiding the verbal ambiguity of words like kings'.

As a suffix forming some adverbs, it represents the genitive singular ending of Old English masculine and neuter nouns and some adjectives.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR S

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.