rudiments

[ roo-duh-muh nt ]SEE DEFINITION OF rudiments
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR RUDIMENTS

They had the rudiments of institutions, which they trusted her to organise.

But the calf has in its upper jaw some rudiments of teeth which never are developed, and never play the part of teeth at all.

And so he knew at least the rudiments of what was now expected of him.

If I am not proficient enough, yet knowing the rudiments I can easily improve.

Some one should have gone who had at least the rudiments of a mind.

Maimon had not learnt to beg, nor had the beggar acquired the rudiments of morality.

It was then for the first time that he received the rudiments of a scientific education.

At the village school he learned the rudiments of the English language.

In the rudiments of knowledge she may be an efficient instructor.

Cases of conscience should alternate with lessons in the rudiments.

WORD ORIGIN

1540s, from Middle French rudiment (16c.) or directly from Latin rudimentum "early training, first experience, beginning, first principle," from rudis "unlearned, untrained" (see rude). Related: Rudiments.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR RUDIMENTS

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.