repugnance

[ ri-puhg-nuhns or ri-puhg-nuhn-see ]SEE DEFINITION OF repugnance

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR REPUGNANCE

As she herself could have assigned no cause for her repugnance, it might be termed instinctive.

It is strange,—the repugnance with which she regarded the suit of her affianced!

Again the thought of it brought Helen a feeling of repugnance.

He did not like to see it on his desk, he had a repugnance to touch it.

Wounded in all her feelings, full of repugnance, she could not get used to it all.

Her limbs, which were still burning, shuddered with repugnance.

But it would need more than repugnance to save him from his destiny.

"No," he said, and there was repugnance in his tone and face.

Have you remembered their pride, their repugnance to the Saxon?

I asked the reason of this repugnance, and she only gave me a vague, unmeaning answer.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., from Old French repugnance "opposition, resistance" (13c.) or directly from Latin repugnantia "incompatibility," from stem of repugnare "resist, disagree, be incompatible" (see repugnant).

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