Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR REFORMATIVE

Its primary purpose is to aid in a reformative or educational process.

The idealism of the eighteenth century was not reformative and humanistic, but revolutionary and humanitarian.

The moral hump is tolerated, even patronised in reformative institutions, but the physical hump, never!

Mr. Oman (Byzantine Empire, p. 145) takes the popular view as to the reformative effect of Christianity.

Therefore: reformative rgimes should function so as to free such prisoners of shackles forged by their lower selves.

Those highest up in reformative councils have obligingly lettered reformative measures to his hand.

He would be out to help make the best use of all reformative tools and to cordinate them.

The keynote of reformative harmony is struck in a prison rgime that ministers meticulously to marketable knowledge and skill.

David had always understood that prisons in their object were not only punitive—they were reformative.

The Benninghausen Labour House makes no such wreck of its own reformative work.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, "to convert into another and better form," from Old French reformer "rebuild, reconstruct, recreate" (12c.), from Latin reformare "to form again, change, transform, alter," from re- "again" (see re-) + formare "to form" (see form (n.)). Intransitive sense from 1580s.

Meaning "to bring (a person) away from an evil course of life" is recorded from early 15c.; of governments, institutions, etc., from early 15c. Related: Reformed; reforming. Reformed churches (1580s) usually are Calvinist as opposed to Lutheran. Reformed Judaism (1843) is a movement initiated in Germany by Moses Mendelssohn (1729-1786). Reform school is attested from 1859.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR REFORMATIVE

amendatory

adjectivecorrective
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.