rarefy

[ rair-uh-fahy ]SEE DEFINITION OF rarefy

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR RAREFY

But if warm dry winds blow upon the clouds, they rarefy the vapour to a greater degree, and temporarily disperse the clouds.

The rarefy of the atmosphere continued to affect the wood-work of the wagons, and the wheels were incessantly falling to pieces.

But extend this vapour, rarefy it; from so narrow a room as our natural bodies, to any politic body, to a state.

The air consequently was damp and gross, for want of stronger rays to open and rarefy it.

But as such means are not at disposal, it becomes necessary to place the terminal in the bulb and rarefy the air in the same.

Would an atmosphere perfumed by these Eastern woods clarify and rarefy our denser Occidental minds?

But as such means are not at disposal, it becomes necessary to place the terminal in a bulb and rarefy the air in the same.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., from Old French rarefier (14c.) and directly from Medieval Latin rarificare, from Latin rarefacere "make rare," from rarus "rare, thin" (see rare (adj.1)) + facere "to make" (see factitious). Related: Rarefied.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR RAREFY

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