purgatory

[ pur-guh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee ]SEE DEFINITION OF purgatory

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PURGATORY

And now his purgatory was at an end, and of a sudden the gates of joy were open.

It's the wail of a lost spirit, loosed temporarily from the horrors of purgatory.

He declared that he was in purgatory for certain unexpatiated sins.

Whence he concludes that it is better at once to deny absolutely that there is any purgatory.

It will take a lot of holy water to save her from purgatory.

Those, however, who are in Purgatory do not pray for us, but rather we for them.

But he did not forget to add that it would be a voluntary plunge from the skies to purgatory.

That the doctrine of purgatory was more inconsistent and absurd than a fairy tale.

That masses said for the dead will release souls from purgatory.

That they did not believe in purgatory, or pay money to get the souls of their friends out of it.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1200, from Old French purgatore and directly from Medieval Latin purgatorium (St. Bernard, early 12c.), in Latin, "means of cleansing," noun use of neuter of purgatorius (adj.) "purging, cleansing," from purgat-, past participle stem of Latin purgare (see purge (v.)). Figurative use from late 14c.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PURGATORY

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.