Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PRUDE

Angioletto could not decide whether to think him rogue or prude.

"For Heaven's sake, don't be a prude, Moya," Joyce snapped irritably.

And apparently the girl was far from being a prude or a snob.

Oh, I dare say they'd make a good team,—one's a prude and the other a prig.

So much that people thought her cold, some even pronouncing her a prude.

For, like most men who are rather animal, he was intellectually a prude.

My dear Ned, I'm no prude, but there's always some devilment in the blood in these cases.

Whatever might be said of the latter, it was clear that she was no prude.

It would have been the proper way at first, with such a prude as she!

Education had not made a prude of her nor tainted her clean purity.

WORD ORIGIN

1704, "woman who affects or upholds modesty in a degree considered excessive," from French prude "excessively prim or demure woman," first recorded in Molière. Perhaps a false back-formation or an ellipsis of preudefemme "a discreet, modest woman," from Old French prodefame "noblewoman, gentlewoman; wife, consort," fem. equivalent of prudhomme "a brave man" (see proud); or perhaps a direct noun use of the French adjective prude "prudish," from Old French prude, prode, preude "good, virtuous, modest," a feminine form of the adjective preux. Also occasionally as an adjective in English 18c.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PRUDE

goody two-shoes

nounsomebody smug and well-behaved
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.