proverb

[ prov-erb ]SEE DEFINITION OF proverb

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PROVERB

"Like master, like man" was a proverb which he saw daily fulfilled.

"As docile as Daisy" might have been a proverb in the neighborhood, so general was this view of her nature.

There's no inconvenience but has its convenience, said Betty, giving me proverb for proverb.

An Italian proverb says: "The furrier gets the skins of more foxes than asses."

"In a multitude of counsellors there is wisdom," saith the proverb.

This proverb is the truth put popularly: that is, it is the truth put wrong.

But “time and patience,” says the Eastern proverb, “change the mulberry leaf to satin.”

Though all cannot live on the piazza,” as the Tuscan proverb has it, “every one may feel the sun.

The proverb says that “an empty bag cannot stand upright;” neither can a man who is in debt.

He realized the truth of the proverb, “Who goes a-borrowing, goes a-sorrowing.”

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, in boke of Prouerbyys, the Old Testament work, from Old French proverbe (12c.) and directly from Latin proverbium "a common saying, old adage, maxim," literally "words put forward," from pro- "forth" (see pro-) + verbum "word" (see verb). Used generally from late 14c. The Book of Proverbs in Old English was cwidboc, from cwide "speech, saying, proverb, homily," related to cwiddian "to talk, speak, say, discuss;" cwiddung "speech, saying, report."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PROVERB

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