predicate

[ verb pred-i-keyt; adjective, noun pred-i-kit ]SEE DEFINITION OF predicate

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PREDICATE

The train of consequences which follows, is inferred by altering the predicate into 'not many.'

Of all such actions we predicate not courage, but a name indicative of order.

In 'the matter seems clear,' 'clear' is part of the predicate of 'matter.'

A verb should agree in number with its subject, and not with its predicate.

A long subject is often separated from the predicate by a comma.

Where there is no danger of obscurity, the subject must not be separated from the predicate by any point.

Are we therefore to predicate original depravity of man's body?

For all that is predicated of the predicate will be predicated also of the subject.

In reality the essence of which we predicate these attributes is one and simple.

All thought must have an object, and every object must have some predicate.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PREDICATE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.