precursor

[ pri-kur-ser, pree-kur- ]SEE DEFINITION OF precursor

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PRECURSOR

That particular morning seemed to me to be the precursor of a new era.

The Washington, however, was only the precursor of greater vessels.

A lively caricature, the precursor of Dickens' "American Notes."

Has he been rightly called a precursor of the modern spirit?

Rarity, as geology tells us, is the precursor to extinction.

Power must be precursor to an abstraction from power, or weakness.

Jaime looked upon him as a precursor who cleared away his doubts.

A formidable Moorish weapon, the precursor of the boarding-pike.

Precursor of the Reformation To liberal thought attuned the nation.

In physics, as in morals, a storm is frequently the precursor of a dead calm.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PRECURSOR

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