potion

[ poh-shuhn ]SEE DEFINITION OF potion

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR POTION

Mrs Bangham submitted; and the doctor, having administered her potion, took his own.

The opium that I had taken in my potion made my head rather heavy.

But is there any potion which might serve as a test of overboldness and excessive and indiscreet boasting?

Or would you abstain from using the potion altogether, although you have no reason for abstaining?'

At first poison was tried, but she suspected it, and would not take the potion.

The effect of the potion ought to wear off in an hour or so, then he can join the guests.

Juliet's query to the Friar had been, 'What if the potion should not work?'

I took the potion which the count gave me; I lost my senses.

I wish the potion had been made in the new moon; however, it has been blessed.

We gave him the potion; he slumbered for many hours, and has now awakened, weak but well.'

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, pocioun "medicinal drink," from Old French pocion "potion, draught, medicine" (12c.), from Latin potionem (nominative potio) "a potion, a drinking," also "poisonous draught, magic potion," from potus, irregular past participle of potare "to drink," from PIE root *po(i)- "to drink" (cf. Sanskrit pati "drinks," panam "beverage;" Greek pinein "to drink," poton "that which one drinks," potos "drinking bout;" Old Church Slavonic piti "to drink," pivo "beverage"). Potus as a past participle adjective in Latin meant "drunken."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR POTION

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