Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PLUCKED

He plucked the police whistle from his waistcoat-pocket, and raised it to his lips.

It is most like a plucked pullet which has died of the spotted fever.

You have also a right eye that I would have plucked out if I were in your place.

Fill your salad bowl with the crisp leaves, from which the flowerhead has been plucked.

Half strangled, he plucked the cigar from his mouth and stamped on it.

Or a pigeon-pie, perhaps, for the New Yorker is made to be plucked.

I was in the act of following him into the room, when Reuben plucked at my sleeve to detain me.

He plucked up his spirits, and followed it into the workshop of the Golden Key.

Then he wandered about the park and plucked at leaves and twigs.

But he plucked up courage and added swiftly: 'I'll go with you, uncle.

WORD ORIGIN

late Old English ploccian, pluccian "pull off, cull," from West Germanic *plokken (cf. Middle Low German plucken, Middle Dutch plocken, Dutch plukken, Flemish plokken, German pflücken), perhaps from Vulgar Latin *piluccare (cf. Old French peluchier, late 12c.; Italian piluccare), a frequentative, ultimately from Latin pilare "pull out hair," from pilus "hair" (see pile (n.3)). But despite the similarities, OED finds difficulties with this and cites gaps in historical evidence. Related: Plucked; plucking.

This euphemistic use is attested from 1610s. To pluck up "summon up" is from c.1300.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.