phantasm

[ fan-taz-uhm ]SEE DEFINITION OF phantasm

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PHANTASM

It may have been but a phantasm, born of her own fevered imagination.

It is a phantasm which has little or no connection with fact.

Yet, that experience had the sharpness of fact; while this had only the vagueness of a phantasm.

Then no exaggeration was too absurd for him, no phantasm too unreal, no climax too extreme.

Perhaps this is true—the world a phantasm and our minds fooling us.

A phantasm, in my opinion, is a phenomena that cannot be explained by any physical laws.

My first experience of this kind of phantasm occurred when I was a boy.

How still and clear is To, a phantasm with the semblance of permanence!

Should I bear apples if a phantasm seemed to come and plant me?

His presence fainted out into a phantasm, and that into nothing at all.

WORD ORIGIN

early 13c., fantesme, from Old French fantosme "a dream, illusion, fantasy; apparition, ghost, phantom" (12c.), and directly from Latin phantasma "an apparition, specter," from Greek phantasma "image, phantom, apparition; mere image, unreality," from phantazein "to make visible, display," from stem of phainein "to bring to light, make appear; come to light, be seen, appear; explain, expound, inform against; appear to be so," from PIE root *bha- (1) "to shine" (cf. Sanskrit bhati "shines, glitters," Old Irish ban "white, light, ray of light"). Spelling conformed to Latin from 16c. (see ph). A spelling variant of phantom, "differentiated, but so that the differences are elusive" [Fowler].

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PHANTASM

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.