personify

[ per-son-uh-fahy ]SEE DEFINITION OF personify

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PERSONIFY

Like mythology, Greek philosophy has a tendency to personify ideas.

This is only a convenience, because it seems necessary to personify.

That man has a strong motive for my death, and to personify me afterwards.

Now it is often convenient to personify Nature, but we must not be misled.

It is natural for us to personify and envelop in mystery the things that we do not understand.

There is in the human mind a tendency to personify abstractions.

His whole soul was absorbed in these adventures, and he appeared to personify the traveller.

A fugitive slave may be said to personify "life, liberty, and happiness."

It will be noticed that unless a force intrudes itself on him he does not personify it.

There is innate in all men a tendency to personify the forces they cannot understand.

WORD ORIGIN

1727 "to attribute personal form to things or abstractions" (especially as an artistic or literary technique), from person + -fy or from French personnifier (17c.), from personne. Meaning "to represent, embody" attested from 1806. Related: Personified; personifying.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PERSONIFY

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