pasquinade

[ pas-kwuh-neyd ]SEE DEFINITION OF pasquinade

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PASQUINADE

The author of the pasquinade in question is, I believe, unknown.

A pasquinade printed as a broadside and stuck up in New York city.

I told him, he shou'd not try to pasquinade the Source of his Poesy.

But how are we to understand the uses of the pasquinade Hymn?

The pasquinade or the squib gets a hold on the mind, and in its very drollery will ensure its being retained there.'

A pasquinade, comparing his reign to that of Nero, was affixed to the palace gate.

Cudgelling was at one time used as the remedy in cases of outrageous libel and pasquinade.

That motto from the prologue to Persius' book of satires might be inscribed on the title-page of Gozzi's pasquinade.

A pasquinade was originally an anonymous lampoon affixed to a statue of a gladiator which still stands in Rome.

WORD ORIGIN

"a lampoon," 1650s, from Middle French, from Italian pasquinata (c.1500), from Pasquino, name given to a mutilated ancient statue (now known to represent Menelaus dragging the dead Patroclus) set up by Cardinal Caraffa in his palace in Rome in 1501; the locals named it after a schoolmaster (or tailor, or barber) named Pasquino who lived nearby. A custom developed of posting satirical verses and lampoons on the statue.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PASQUINADE

satire

nounridicule intended to expose truth
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