Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PACKS UP

With packs up they marched uphill wherever the Turk might see them.

It packs up into a roll of canvas and a bundle of five or six sticks.

Anyway, what would be the use of looking at the list; it will be time when he packs up to go home.

Massingbred bids them do their worst, packs up, sets out for the town, and makes a speech exposing them all!

His order done, Dutton straightway lays down his commission; packs up, that night, and returns to England.

Then when it comes time to get out, she will sing while you and I are getting our packs up the cliff.

He sells his farm, packs up his goods and cash in his waggon, and starts for regions more congenially wild.

She packs up her jewels, and he takes her to a wood, where she sees eleven maids hanging.

She packs up her chlorosis and disappears with Erna, mumbling something about like father, like son, and goodness knows what.

Therefore, in general, an ordinary knapsack will answer very well for packs up to say thirty pounds.

WORD ORIGIN

"bundle," early 13c., probably from a Low German word (cf. Middle Dutch pac, pack "bundle," Middle Low German pak, Middle Flemish pac, attested from late 12c.), originally a term of wool traders in Flanders; or possibly from Old Norse pakki. All are of unknown origin.

Italian pacco is a Dutch loan word; French pacque probably is from Flemish. Meaning "set of persons" (usually of a low character) is c.1300, older than sense of "group of hunting animals" (early 15c.). Extended to collective sets of playing cards (1590s), floating ice (1791), cigarettes (1924), and submarines (1943). Meaning "knapsack on a frame" is attested from 1916. Pack of lies first attested 1763.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.