novitiate

[ noh-vish-ee-it, -eyt ]SEE DEFINITION OF novitiate

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR NOVITIATE

The novitiate has its great joys, but it has its great trials also.

So she began her novitiate and was presently received into the order.

The air of assurance and dignity about it all was exceedingly noticeable to the novitiate.

It may have been so; he was still in his novitiate of infamy.

We ourselves do not care to take pupils who have no idea at all of the novitiate.

He will review them as soon as his two years of novitiate are over.

I see no difficulty in putting Mlle. de Grouchy into the novitiate; why not also Fontanges, who desires it so ardently?

I have sent word to Mme. de Brinon to examine them all, and to begin nothing for the novitiate until my return.

But it was in Italy that he had passed through his novitiate as an artist.

Our novitiate is a large apartment with five immense windows in it.

WORD ORIGIN

also noviciate, "state of being a novice," c.1600, from Middle French noviciat or directly from Medieval Latin novitiatus, from Late Latin novitius "novice," from Latin adjective novicius (see novice).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR NOVITIATE

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