notion

[ noh-shuh n ]SEE DEFINITION OF notion

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR NOTION

But it was always my notion, that children should not dispute their parents' authority.

But I more wonder, how he came to have a notion of meeting me in this place?

Some notion of its extent may be gathered from the fact that he possessed 120 cows.

For she thought in the night he will forget his notion, as had often been the case, and he will have some other fancy.

He rattled the snaffle in his mouth with nervous indecision—he had a notion to try it.

"Och, that was only a notion that came into my head," John answered.

Shell be greatly taken, with the notion that he sent for me instead of me running after him!

And you have no notion what a mass of work he has got to get through every day.

It is but bare justice to him to say that he had no notion of appearing good to Stevie.

Pre-occupied with this notion, Russell was now omitted in all her combinations.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., from Latin notionem (nominative notio) "concept, conception, idea, notice," noun of action from past participle stem of noscere "come to know" (see know). Coined by Cicero as a loan-translation of Greek ennoia "act of thinking, notion, conception," or prolepsis "previous notion, previous conception."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR NOTION

whimsy

nounodd or fanciful notion
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.