Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR NIGHT

Say, you come out with me some night jest in your workin' clothes.

They were the last she heard sung by Paralus, the night Anaxagoras departed from Athens.

At parting, she urged Eudora to share her apartment for the night.

He was so good they shot him all up one night last fall over to Wardner.

Slept in snow-drift that night in wet clothes, mercury 40 below.

It was the night you and the folks went to the opera with the Oldakers.

You may have noticed that night at the Oldakers'—well, women, Mr. Bines, are uncertain.

His nephew was securely disposed of for the night, being fastened in his chamber.

They talked until late into the night of what he should "lay out" to do.

Many words of the talkative German were running in his mind from the night before.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English niht (West Saxon neaht, Anglian næht, neht) "night, darkness;" the vowel indicating that the modern word derives from oblique cases (genitive nihte, dative niht), from Proto-Germanic *nakht- (cf. Old Saxon and Old High German naht, Old Frisian and Dutch nacht, German Nacht, Old Norse natt, Gothic nahts).

The Germanic words are from PIE *nekwt- "night" (cf. Greek nuks "a night," Latin nox, Old Irish nochd, Sanskrit naktam "at night," Lithuanian naktis "night," Old Church Slavonic nosti, Russian noch', Welsh henoid "tonight"), according to Watkins, probably from a verbal root *neg- "to be dark, be night." For spelling with -gh- see fight.

Cf. German Weihnachten "Christmas." In early times, the day was held to begin at sunset, so Old English monanniht "Monday night" was the night before Monday, or what we would call Sunday night.

To work nights preserves the Old English genitive of time. Night shift is attested from 1710 in the sense of "garment worn by a woman at night" (see shift (n.1)); meaning "gang of workers employed after dark" is from 1839. Night soil "excrement" (1770) is so called because it was removed (from cesspools, etc.) after dark. Night train attested from 1838. Night life "habitual nocturnal carousing" attested from 1852.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR NIGHT

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.