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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.
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QUIZZES

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EXAMPLE SENTENCES FROM THE WEB

She was dressed in a high-necked dress of black lace, and wore in her corsage a large circular ornament of diamonds and emeralds.
THE DOCTOR OF PIMLICOWILLIAM LE QUEUX
The landlady, clad in a low-necked black dress with long sweeping train, was typical of many we saw in the old-country hotels.
She undid it, freed her thin shoulders, and saw herself a bride in low-necked satin, walking down an aisle with Lucius Harney.
SUMMEREDITH WHARTON
As Mr. Wilding, his back to her a moment, closed the door, Ruth slipped the paper hurriedly into the bosom of her low-necked gown.
MISTRESS WILDINGRAFAEL SABATINI
There were covered carts looking like sun-bonnets on wheels and pulled by humped-necked oxen.
THE BELTED SEASARTHUR COLTON
Here comes the wonderful one-hoss shay, Drawn by a rat-tailed, ewe-necked bay, "Huddup!"
Bland was stiff-necked, vain, the sort to be brutal in retaliation for any fancied invasion of his rights.
THE HIDDEN PLACESBERTRAND W. SINCLAIR
It was dreadful to have to wear woollen, high-necked and long-sleeved.
Tenors are generally short, stubby men with brief necks, while baritones are for the most part tall, spare and long-necked.
This monster of self-righteousness, this stiff-necked beast, needs a big axe.

WORD OF THE DAY

boondogglenoun | [boon-dog-uh l, -daw-guh l]SEE DEFINITION