Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MORE MARINE

I had wirelessed asking for a dinghy to be sent down, which would enable Hamilton to do more marine work; and it now came to hand.

There is a great error in supposing that there are more marine disasters among American than among British ships.

The latter, too, is more marine in the localities it frequents, scarcely ever entering fresh or indeed inland waters.

WORD ORIGIN

14c., "seacoast;" see marine (adj.). Meaning "collective shipping of a country" is from 1660s. Meaning "soldier who serves on a ship" is from 1670s, a separate borrowing from French marine, from the French adjective. Phrase tell that to the marines (1806) originally was the first half of a retort expressing skepticism:

The book, a rollicking sea romance/adventure novel, was popular in its day and the remark is a recurring punch line in it (repeated at least four times). It was written by naval veteran John Davis (1774-1854) but published under the name John Moore. Walsh records that, "The marines are among the 'jolly' jack-tars a proverbially gullible lot, capable of swallowing any yarn, in size varying from a yawl-boat to a full-rigged frigate."

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.