member

[ mem-ber ]SEE DEFINITION OF member

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MEMBER

The only member of that household I could marry is not suited to my age.

Great credit is also due to the second in command, and to every member of the party.

He was a member of the Cabinet, but not of the House of Commons.

Miss Hilton, a member of the Overton faculty, would chaperon her.

Fifty years before, on that day, he had been returned to Parliament as member for Newark.

There was nothing Christlike about her; still she was a member of the Church.

Strada was the only member of the company who interested the audience.

The young man was sent to college that he might be a member of a gentler caste.

This farm to which he had devoted his life was taking it from him by a member of its herd.

This was done, and I was up and dressed before any other member of the family was stirring.

WORD ORIGIN

late 13c., "sex organ" (cf. Latin membrum virile, but in English originally of women as well as men), also, "body part or organ" (in plural, "the body"), from Old French membre "part, portion; topic, subject; limb, member of the body; member" (of a group, etc.)," 11c., from Latin membrum "limb, member of the body, part," probably from PIE *mems-ro, from root *mems- "flesh, meat" (cf. Sanskrit mamsam "flesh;" Greek meninx "membrane," meros "thigh" (the "fleshy part"); Gothic mimz "flesh"). In English, sense of "person belonging to a group" is first attested early 14c., from notion of "constituent part of a complex structure." Meaning "one who has been elected to parliament" is from early 15c.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MEMBER

cock

nounpenis (vulgar)

cocked

nounpenis (vulgar)
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.