marathon

[ mar-uh-thon, -thuh n ]SEE DEFINITION OF marathon

Synonyms for marathon

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MARATHON

I feel like a two-year-old: I could do a Marathon without turning a hair.

Find out why a long distance run is now called a "Marathon."

How long after the battle of Marathon, and after the death of Alexander the Great?

They knew that these were intended to avenge the defeat of Marathon.

I've never heard a word from you since the day we ran the Marathon.

It was in the spring of their senior year that Jim and Sara ran the Marathon.

This mound has continued to stand at Marathon to the present day.

Miltiades found that the fame and honor which he had gained at Marathon were gone.

He might have been a Marathon athlete, so far as any hint to the contrary went.

Such is the present Marathon—we are summoned back to the past.

WORD ORIGIN

1896, marathon race, from story of Greek hero Pheidippides, who in 490 B.C.E. ran the 26 miles and 385 yards to Athens from the Plains of Marathon to tell of the allied Greek victory there over Persian army. The original story (Herodotus) is that he ran from Athens to Sparta to seek aid, which arrived too late to participate in the battle. Introduced as an athletic event in the 1896 revival of the Olympic Games, based on a later, less likely story, and quickly extended to mean "any very long event or activity." Related: Marathoner (by 1912).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MARATHON

race

nounpursuit; running, speeding
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.