lugubrious

[ loo-goo-bree-uhs, -gyoo- ]SEE DEFINITION OF lugubrious

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LUGUBRIOUS

Miette, after a woman's fashion, was partial to lugubrious subjects.

But Aristide felt some doubts on the point; he had suspicions of some lugubrious farce.

He was too downcast even to sing one of his lugubrious hymns or to whistle.

"It's darker in the grave," observed Captain Perez with lugubrious philosophy.

Crane stared at the deceptive bag in the most lugubrious astonishment.

How long and lugubrious this meal by the bedside of my sick friend appeared to me!

There was a lugubrious attempt at a smile as she turned her eyes toward him.

"I see nothing for it but to give up," said one lugubrious member.

“A most lugubrious spot,” said Will, surveying it sadly as he rode forward.

In all this a predominant and lugubrious impression of keys and bolts.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1600, from Latin lugubris "mournful, pertaining to mourning," from lugere "to mourn," from PIE root *leug- "to break; to cause pain" (cf. Greek lygros "mournful, sad," Sanskrit rujati "breaks, torments," Lettish lauzit "to break the heart"). Related: Lugubriously; lugubriousness.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR LUGUBRIOUS

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.