lover

[ luhv-er ]SEE DEFINITION OF lover

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LOVER

Her lover played upon his flute, while she leaned against a tree and listened.

He was older than I, experienced with women—a lover of women, I came to understand in time.

If it be possible for so universal a lover to be confined so long to one object?

Calvert, my friend, is a lover as well as a painter of nature.

The lover wrestled with Providence for his foreshadowed bliss.

And have you not before now said, that nothing is so penetrating as the eye of a lover who has vanity?

He is a lover of truth, and advocates the only way to arrive at it, which is by unfettered thought.

Perhaps "love" is left to the fervent vocabulary of the lover.

Shakespeare was almost as well content, it appears, to play the lover as to play the Duke.

Though a lover and possessed by his mistress Shakespeare was still an artist.

WORD ORIGIN

early 13c., agent noun from love (v.). Old English had lufend for male lovers, lufestre for women. Meaning "one who has a predilection for" (a thing, concept, pursuit, etc.) is mid-14c. As a form of address to a lover, from 1911. Related: Loverly.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR LOVER

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.