liquefy

[ lik-wuh-fahy ]SEE DEFINITION OF liquefy

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LIQUEFY

No power that we have will liquefy air at its ordinary temperature.

The pentoxid was replaced for several weeks until it ceased to liquefy.

If these crystals be heated to about 45° they liquefy, and the gas flies off.

The brains do not liquefy either: they simply melt into a thin gruel.

They cannot be kept, as they liquefy at ordinary temperatures.

So far as known they are able to liquefy gelatin (also a peptonizing process) and form spores.

As a group these bacteria are characterized by their inability to liquefy gelatin or develop spores.

And when the stone has commenced to liquefy, the lead flows out through some small cavities, and the copper remains within.

The cooling effect of passing a gas such as air or oxygen through a narrow orifice has been used to liquefy the gas.

Why will some substances absorb moisture from the air, and liquefy, while others become as dry as dust under like conditions?

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR LIQUEFY

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