Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LION

Well, boy, I'd say that the lion had been chawed up considerable—by dogs.

It is a fool's plan to teach a man to be a cur in peace, and think that he will be a lion in war.

I want to make a cushion of my lion's skin, for the weight to rest upon.

But pretty soon there was plenty of sound, for the lion was catching up.

That one is the lion; and they hunt him with spears in the long grass.

The diversion occurred at the moment of the lion's greatest tension.

There is no more exciting sport than that of lion shooting afoot.

M'tela took form as a big man with a voice like the lion at night.

No; the spirit of a lion is not to be roused by the teasing of an insect.

The Huron arose, and shook himself like a lion quitting his lair.

WORD ORIGIN

late 12c., from Old French lion "lion," figuratively "hero," from Latin leonem (nominative leo) "lion; the constellation leo," from Greek leon (genitive leontos), from a non-Indo-European language, perhaps Semitic (cf. Hebrew labhi "lion," plural lebaim; Egyptian labai, lawai "lioness").

A general Germanic borrowing from Latin (cf. Old English leo, Anglian lea; Old Frisian lawa; Middle Dutch leuwe, Dutch leeuw; Old High German lewo, German Löwe); it is found in most European languages, often via Germanic (cf. Old Church Slavonic livu, Polish lew, Czech lev, Old Irish leon, Welsh llew). Used figuratively from c.1200 in an approving sense, "one who is fiercely brave," and a disapproving one, "tyrannical leader, greedy devourer." Lion's share "the greatest portion" is attested from 1701.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR LION

cat

nounfeline animal, sometimes a pet
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.