Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LECTURE

Was it probable that she had anything suitable to wear to a lecture?

There was another listener at the lecture who was unexpectedly present.

"Why, I've delivered quite a lecture upon beauty," Miss Coleman said.

I could have heard the lecture, but I couldn't spare my hands.

The instrument formed the subject of the Bakerian lecture for the year 1871.

I answered at random and longed for the meal to end —until I remembered my lecture.

Didn't you see the lady with Minnie and the judge at the lecture?

For several years Dr. Kirtland has declined to lecture on any subject.

When I said I hoped not, he replied that it would not be necessary for him to attend the lecture.

Produced statistics to show how few saloons failed after a lecture.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., "action of reading, that which is read," from Medieval Latin lectura "a reading, lecture," from Latin lectus, past participle of legere "to read," originally "to gather, collect, pick out, choose" (cf. election), from PIE *leg- "to pick together, gather, collect" (cf. Greek legein "to say, tell, speak, declare," originally, in Homer, "to pick out, select, collect, enumerate;" lexis "speech, diction;" logos "word, speech, thought, account;" Latin lignum "wood, firewood," literally "that which is gathered").

To read is to "pick out words." Meaning "action of reading (a lesson) aloud" is from 1520s. That of "a discourse on a given subject before an audience for purposes of instruction" is from 1530s.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR LECTURE

address

nounspeech given to formal gathering
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.