lavender

[ lav-uh n-der ]SEE DEFINITION OF lavender

Synonyms for lavender

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EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LAVENDER

Along the edge of the green pines and spruce were lavender asters.

Two other women, all clad in lavender, appeared in the doorway.

Drawers and chests at "Gunn's" had been thick strewn with lavender for half a century.

It was lavender water; he drenched her hair and brow and hands.

There were other mountains, lavender and gray, in the distance.

He was dressed immaculately in white with a gay tie of lavender.

Mr. Lavender, who habitually spoke, the truth, looked at him with a sort of horror.

"I will," responded Mr. Lavender, taking off his holland coat.

"Thank you, my boy," said Mr. Lavender, producing a shilling.

Mr. Lavender sighed, his hunger quarelling with his sense of duty.

WORD ORIGIN

"fragrant plant of the mint family," c.1300, from Anglo-French lavendre, Old French lavendre, from Medieval Latin lavendula "lavender" (10c.), perhaps from Latin lividus "bluish, livid." Associated with French lavande, Italian lavanda "a washing" (from Latin lavare "to wash;" see lave) because it was used to scent washed fabrics and as a bath perfume. (An identical Middle English word meant "laundress, washerwoman;" also, apparently, "prostitute, whore; camp follower" and is attested as a surname from early 13c.). The adjective meaning "pale purple color" is from 1840.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR LAVENDER

mauve

adjectivepurplish color
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.