indisposition

[ in-dis-puh-zish-uh n ]SEE DEFINITION OF indisposition

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR INDISPOSITION

It was only an indisposition, pure and simple,—an abscess in the armpit; that was all.

I am so sorry to hear about Mrs. Swanborough's indisposition.

Was the child's indisposition graver than she had led Ruth to suppose?

He made the most of his indisposition to Almayer, who came to visit him twice a day.

I gave prompt assurances that my indisposition was not serious.

Was it anxiety caused by the indisposition of his illustrious client?

For your indisposition prevents us from deriving any pleasure from this and other news.

For lunch she drank some beef tea, keeping up the fiction of her indisposition.

Is he likely to have any return of the indisposition from which, owing to your efforts, he has been suffering?

He had not been able to hide his anxiety on hearing of Toni's indisposition.

WORD ORIGIN

early 15c., "unfavorable influence" (in astrology); also in Middle English, "ill health, disorder of the mind or body; unfavorable disposition, hostility; inclination to evil; wickedness; public disorder, lawlessness," from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + disposition.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR INDISPOSITION

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