importune

[ im-pawr-toon, -tyoon, im-pawr-chuhn ]SEE DEFINITION OF importune

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR IMPORTUNE

I importune the Supreme Council for a post, a crust of bread, a home!

Are these matters wherewith to importune a stranger—a guest?

I must obey you at the city gate; but I will importune you here.

No use to importune her to act against her instincts—not a bit of use!

Though Jupiter should grant his request to each, we should continue to importune him.

My mother had for some time ceased to importune my father about my return.

He knew what parties to deal with—where to importune—where to forbear.

I fear to importune you by the length of this letter; but you will pardon me the liberty I take.

I intend to converse and argue and importune and insist and nag and nag.

I will not importune you, Madam, and urge a princess who knows well what she has to do.

WORD ORIGIN

1520s, back-formation from importunity, or else from Middle French importuner, from Medieval Latin importunari "to make oneself troublesome," from Latin importunus "unfit, troublesome," originally "having no harbor" (i.e. "difficult to access"), from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + portus "harbor" (see port (n.1)). Related: Importuned; importuning. As an adjective from early 15c.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR IMPORTUNE

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