impermanent

[ im-pur-muh-nuhnt ]SEE DEFINITION OF impermanent

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR IMPERMANENT

All conditions are impermanent, and so, in the profounder sense, unreal.

In such moments the thoughts that visited her were impermanent and fleeting.

The necessity to counteract by impermanent sojourn the permanence of arrest.

Yet the need for religion is impermanent, like all else in life.

Their lives are like their work,—impermanent, detached from others', unobserved.

The state of nature, then, is a fleeting and impermanent process.

But it was one of the least frequent and the most impermanent of His moods.

Fashion, as we have shown, had a slow and impermanent effect upon village ideals.

Even on that view, however, the impermanent type must in some degree have affected that which survived.

He who abstracts himself from the "plurality of the phenomenal world" anticipates the cessation of the impermanent.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR IMPERMANENT

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.