Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR HABITED

But,” questioned Kearney, “may I ask why you are habited as I now see you?

No rescue came, and he was led, yet habited in his armour, to the block.

Ernst too was habited in a richer dress than he had ever before worn.

An entire corner of this charming spot was in habited by bees.

The President was in scarlet, having before been habited in black.

This is devoid of all reference to persons and habited places.

She is habited as a nun, for she founded the Convent of Longchamps, and died there, its abbess.

Although he was habited more plainly than any, he was like a king in their midst.

When clothed it is termed either "vested" or "habited" (Fig. 268).

The Countess is habited in an heraldic mantle of crosses crosslet.

WORD ORIGIN

early 13c., "characteristic attire of a religious or clerical order," from Old French habit, abit (12c.) "clothing, (ecclesiastical) habit; conduct," from Latin habitus "condition, demeanor, appearance, dress," originally past participle of habere "to have, to hold, possess," from PIE root *ghabh- "to seize, take, hold, have, give, receive" (cf. Sanskrit gabhasti- "hand, forearm;" Old Irish gaibim "I take, hold, I have," gabal "act of taking;" Lithuanian gabana "armful," gabenti "to remove;" Gothic gabei "riches;" Old English giefan, Old Norse gefa "to give").

Base sense probably "to hold," which can be either in offering or in taking. Applied in Latin to both inner and outer states of being, and taken over in both sense by English, though meaning of "dress" is now restricted to monks and nuns. Meaning "customary practice" is early 14c. Drug sense is from 1887.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.