guillotine

[ gil-uh-teen, gee-uh-; verb gil-uh-teen, gee-uh- ]SEE DEFINITION OF guillotine

Synonyms for guillotine

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR GUILLOTINE

He did not quite see the connection between the bon-bons and the guillotine.

It was now half-past three, and the guillotine was nearly ready.

You know it is a capital crime, to mourn for, or sympathise with, a victim of the Guillotine.

Not merely the cannons and rifles, but even the guillotine and the gallows were at rest.

It was his fate to escape the gallows in England and the guillotine in France.

Anti-republicans can only expiate their folly under the age of the guillotine.

Didn't the father cut his own throat to save the guillotine the trouble of doing so?

No, the guillotine was not enough; he deserved to be cut into little pieces.

His eyes assumed a soft ecstatic expression at the mention of the guillotine.

At this thought, they imagined they were being pursued and dragged to the guillotine.

WORD ORIGIN

"The name of the machine in which the axe descends in grooves from a considerable height so that the stroke is certain and the head instantly severed from the body." ["Universal Magazine of Knowledge and Pleasure," January 1793], 1791, from French guillotine, named in recognition of French physician Joseph Guillotin (1738-1814), who as deputy to the National Assembly (1789) proposed, for humanitarian and efficiency reasons, that capital punishment be carried out by beheading quickly and cleanly on a machine, which was built in 1791 and first used the next year. The verb is first attested 1794. Related: Guillotined; guillotining.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR GUILLOTINE

behead

verbdecapitate
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.