gossip

[ gos-uhp ]SEE DEFINITION OF gossip

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR GOSSIP

No wonder Florence has a hard time of it; but isn't it wretched of me to gossip?

That's all gossip, you know; not a word of truth in it, and it's been very annoying to us both.

For her part, she was busy and could not spare time to gossip.

I don't know what the hell she'd do for gossip if we were to get married.

Narcisse listened, smiling, and in his turn began to gossip confidentially.

Or because of the gossip that Arthur is to have the estates?

With no close neighbors there would be no gossip to worry about in this little corner.

For if I remain here much longer the gossip that you arouse will ruin me.

In truth they did not attempt to follow the sense of the gossip of the good old lady.

Much of this gossip deals with matters which are not of an elevating character.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English godsibb "sponsor, godparent," from God + sibb "relative" (see sibling). Extended in Middle English to "any familiar acquaintance" (mid-14c.), especially to woman friends invited to attend a birth, later to "anyone engaging in familiar or idle talk" (1560s). Sense extended 1811 to "trifling talk, groundless rumor." Similar formations in Old Norse guðsifja, Old Saxon guþziff.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR GOSSIP

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.