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generation

[ jen-uh-rey-shuh n ]SEE DEFINITION OF generation

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR GENERATION

And the generation born after the Second World War has come of age.

For not only leadership is passed from generation to generation, but so is stewardship.

It was a gospel that had to be preached with tears and beseechings from one generation to another.

For Gerald Raymount, it made a man of him—which he is not who is of no service to his generation.

In the course of a generation he had become an established institution.

Doubtless posterity has acquired a better city by the calamity of that generation.

Dear old Dr. Rathbone, wise in his generation and big of heart!

Yet who can be to the present generation even what Scott has been to the past?

The trouble of one generation of scientists may be turned to the honour and service of the next.

One would have said he belonged to the generation before his brother.

WORD ORIGIN

early 14c., "body of individuals born about the same period" (usually 30 years), from Old French generacion (12c.) and directly from Latin generationem (nominative generatio) "generating, generation," noun of action from past participle stem of generare "bring forth" (see genus). Meanings "act or process of procreation," "process of being formed," "offspring of the same parent" are late 14c.

Generation gap first recorded 1967; generation x is 1991, from Douglas Coupland book of that name; generation y attested by 1994. Related: Generational. Adjectival phrase first-generation, second-generation, etc. with reference to U.S. immigrants is from 1896.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR GENERATION

spawning

nounreproduction

vintage

nouncrop, especially of wine
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.
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