Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR GATING

Virgilll rot before I do his thousand lines or pay any attention to his gating.

I am disposed to ask you to dispense the gating and the penalties for violating it.

This corresponds to some extent with the English system of 'gating.'

Say, a thousand lines apiece, a week's gating, and a few things of that kind.

Every weaver had his own way of gating, and his own little tricks of weaving.

"Oh, no, sir," said Stalky cheerfully; for a week's gating in the summer term is serious.

The gating, however, did not last many weeks, and before long our friends were back at their old haunts again.

Undoubtedly, commented Mr. Roylston, but I have had the unpleasant duty of gating you for a month.

WORD ORIGIN

"opening, entrance," Old English geat (plural geatu) "gate, door, opening, passage, hinged framework barrier," from Proto-Germanic *gatan (cf. Old Norse gat "opening, passage," Old Saxon gat "eye of a needle, hole," Old Frisian gat "hole, opening," Dutch gat "gap, hole, breach," German Gasse "street"), of unknown origin. Meaning "money collected from selling tickets" dates from 1896 (short for gate money, 1820). Gate-crasher is from 1927. Finnish katu, Lettish gatua "street" are Germanic loan-words.