forest

[ fawr-ist, for- ]SEE DEFINITION OF forest

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR FOREST

He is aged for such a journey, if you came from the Forest since morn.

His spirit yearned after his father, and his heart was sick for his forest home.

It is a venerable chestnut, and known as "the father of the forest."

In a forest, solitude would be life; in a city, it is death.

About daylight I reached a forest in which I could conceal myself during the day.

Far away through the forest might be heard its musical clangor and swell.

There appeared to be more wayfarers on the down than in the forest.

If that be holiness, I could show you hogs in this forest who are fit to head the calendar.

They fished out our rivers and swept up the game like fire in the forest.

Go into the forest and wait until his message is ripe for you.'

WORD ORIGIN

late 13c., "extensive tree-covered district," especially one set aside for royal hunting and under the protection of the king, from Old French forest "forest, wood, woodland" (Modern French forêt), probably ultimately from Late Latin/Medieval Latin forestem silvam "the outside woods," a term from the Capitularies of Charlemagne denoting "the royal forest;" perhaps via Old High German forst, from Latin foris "outside" (see foreign), with a sense of "beyond the park," the park being the main or central fenced woodland.

Another theory traces it through Medieval Latin forestis, originally "forest preserve, game preserve," from Latin forum in legal sense "court, judgment;" in other words "land subject to a ban" [Buck]. Replaced Old English wudu.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR FOREST

tree

nounlarge plant enclosed in bark and shedding leaves

trees

nounlarge plant enclosed in bark and shedding leaves
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.