flagellate

[ verb flaj-uh-leyt; adjective, noun flaj-uh-lit, -leyt ]SEE DEFINITION OF flagellate

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR FLAGELLATE

Byron, Shelley, and Moore all flagellate him in their poetry.

I will cut him up, sir; I will flay him—flagellate him—finish him!

At this stage many of the spores assume each a flagellate cilium, and so acquire power of more rapid locomotion.

These cells, called choanocytes, resemble independent animals of the Protozoa, known as flagellate Infusoria or Choanoflagellata.

Most of the flagellate infusoria do just the reverse; they are anodically sensitive or positively galvanotactic.

Other modifications are whip-like processes, or flagellate filaments, called vibracula, which constantly beat the water.

Page 102: "flagellte Infusoria" was changed to "flagellate Infusoria" to match the corresponding index entry.

It was something you could lay hold of; and was laid hold of, for instance, by Miss Lutwyche, to flagellate Mrs. Masham.

Now and again imitation has been resorted to by well-known masters to flagellate the taste of their own day.

The endoderm has cylindrical cells, each one of which has a flagellate hair.

WORD ORIGIN

1620s, from Latin flagellatus, past participle of flagellare "to scourge, lash" (see flagellum). Related: Flagellated; flagellating. An earlier verb for this was flagellen (mid-15c.).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR FLAGELLATE

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