EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR FAT

There—do you see that fat man that's just going out—him as has got on the Indy 'ankycher?

The fat man from behind the register had come to take his order.

Strain the liquid from the veal and bones and remove the fat.

Give the proportions of fat and flour that may be used for pastry.

Remove the fat and serve some of the nicest joints with the soup.

Then wipe the meat carefully and brown it on all sides in the fat.

Remove from the fat, drain, and sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Hamlet lets out inadvertently that he was fat, but he will not say so openly.

He was older than I, but he was also fat, and for all his Shaman's dress I was not frightened.

The Cherub pursed his fat round lips in a soft whistle of enlightenment.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English fætt "fat, fatted, plump, obese," originally a contracted past participle of fættian "to cram, stuff," from Proto-Germanic *faitaz "fat" (cf. Old Frisian fatt, Old Norse feitr, Dutch vet, German feist), from PIE *poid- "to abound in water, milk, fat, etc." (cf. Greek piduein "to gush forth"), from root *peie- "to be fat, swell" (cf. Sanskrit payate "swells, exuberates," pituh "juice, sap, resin;" Lithuanian pienas "milk;" Greek pion "fat, wealthy;" Latin pinguis "fat").

Teen slang meaning "attractive, up to date" (also later phat) is attested from 1951. Fat cat "privileged and rich person" is from 1928; fat chance "no chance at all" attested from 1906. Fathead is from 1842; fat-witted is from 1590s; fatso is first recorded 1944. Expression the fat is in the fire originally meant "the plan has failed" (1560s).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR FAT

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.